Bibliography

African leaders and corruption

This paper explores the reasons why African leaders in quasi democratic regimes have used their political position to embezzle economic resources. First, it explores the historical context of corruption in Africa, showing that corruption is the product of wider historical, political and economic processes. Using the case of a hypothetical country, it then discusses the theme of embezzlement of public resources using a model of budgetary capture – how corrupt rulers are able to target national budgets to accelerate the pace of rapid personal enrichment. Finally, it conceptualizes these events within a political theory of economic embezzlement. It concludes that, although some leaders have diverted public resources for personal enrichment in a bid to satisfy their egos, one of the most powerful reasons for massive financial aggrandizement is the instinct for political self-preservation against real and imagined adversaries, including the active encouragement accorded to loyal allies from other tribal communities to participate in this preservation. Bibliogr., notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: African leaders and corruption
Author: Khalil Timamy, M.H.
Year: 2005
Periodical: Review of African Political Economy
Volume: 32
Issue: 104-105
Pages: 383-393
Language: English
Geographic term: Africa
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03056240500329270
Abstract: This paper explores the reasons why African leaders in quasi democratic regimes have used their political position to embezzle economic resources. First, it explores the historical context of corruption in Africa, showing that corruption is the product of wider historical, political and economic processes. Using the case of a hypothetical country, it then discusses the theme of embezzlement of public resources using a model of budgetary capture – how corrupt rulers are able to target national budgets to accelerate the pace of rapid personal enrichment. Finally, it conceptualizes these events within a political theory of economic embezzlement. It concludes that, although some leaders have diverted public resources for personal enrichment in a bid to satisfy their egos, one of the most powerful reasons for massive financial aggrandizement is the instinct for political self-preservation against real and imagined adversaries, including the active encouragement accorded to loyal allies from other tribal communities to participate in this preservation. Bibliogr., notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]