Bibliography

The rural transportation problem and public policy in Nigeria

Three questions guide the present analysis of rural transportation problems in Nigeria: What is the perception of rural dwellers themselves? What is the policy of the government? How congruous are the rural dwellers’ perceptions and government policy? The author uses two types of sources: data from field surveys carried out in 1980 in riverine areas in the Niger delta of Bendel and Rivers States, and in the inland parts of Bendel, Ondo and Oyo States, around the towns of Benin, Akure and Ibadan, on the one hand, and various government publications and documents, such as national and state development plans, on the other. He discovers that of all the transport problems, the lack of public transportation seems to be the most fundamental. This, together with the problem of bad roads, is reflected in high transport fares in rural areas, another problem seen as serious by rural dwellers. In spite of this, the emphasis in government policy has been almost entirely on the provision of more roads in rural areas or the improvement of existing ones. Thus perhaps the greatest challenge of rural transportation is not necessarily locational inaccessibility, but personal inaccessibility, particularly because the level of vehicle ownership is very low. Bibliogr.

Title: The rural transportation problem and public policy in Nigeria
Author: Ikporukpo, C.O.
Year: 1990
Periodical: The Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies
Volume: 32
Issue: 2
Pages: 159-175
Language: English
Geographic term: Nigeria
Abstract: Three questions guide the present analysis of rural transportation problems in Nigeria: What is the perception of rural dwellers themselves? What is the policy of the government? How congruous are the rural dwellers’ perceptions and government policy? The author uses two types of sources: data from field surveys carried out in 1980 in riverine areas in the Niger delta of Bendel and Rivers States, and in the inland parts of Bendel, Ondo and Oyo States, around the towns of Benin, Akure and Ibadan, on the one hand, and various government publications and documents, such as national and state development plans, on the other. He discovers that of all the transport problems, the lack of public transportation seems to be the most fundamental. This, together with the problem of bad roads, is reflected in high transport fares in rural areas, another problem seen as serious by rural dwellers. In spite of this, the emphasis in government policy has been almost entirely on the provision of more roads in rural areas or the improvement of existing ones. Thus perhaps the greatest challenge of rural transportation is not necessarily locational inaccessibility, but personal inaccessibility, particularly because the level of vehicle ownership is very low. Bibliogr.