Bibliography

Thoughts on certain relationships between gender, kinship and development among the Tswana of Botswana

In his study of kinship and social change, A. Kuper (1986) has recently shown how the Sotho-Nguni cultural principle, whereby cattle herding is mainly the concern of men and cultivation that of women, has combined with labour migration to lower the status of women in the frequently barely cultivable drought lands of Botswana, resulting in, among other things, a series of sexual liaisons rather than stable marriages backed by significant bridewealth payments. This paper deals with three new questions which Kuper’s discussion raised: To what extent can the differentiation of male and female labour enrich the understanding of traditional arranged marriages (part 1); to what extent, despite the decline of marriage in the strictest sense of the term, have kinship ties beyond the narrow domestic domain continued to be influenced by gender (part 2); and to what extent have other social changes additional to labour migration (a booming cattle economy, an enormous expansion in the discovery of diamonds and other minerals, and a growth of the manufacturing industry) affected the division of male and female labour and marriage stability (part 3). Bibliogr., notes, ref.

Title: Thoughts on certain relationships between gender, kinship and development among the Tswana of Botswana
Author: Glickman, Maurice
Year: 1988
Periodical: African Studies
Volume: 47
Issue: 2
Pages: 81-87
Language: English
Geographic term: Botswana
External link: https://doi.org/10.1080/00020188808707691
Abstract: In his study of kinship and social change, A. Kuper (1986) has recently shown how the Sotho-Nguni cultural principle, whereby cattle herding is mainly the concern of men and cultivation that of women, has combined with labour migration to lower the status of women in the frequently barely cultivable drought lands of Botswana, resulting in, among other things, a series of sexual liaisons rather than stable marriages backed by significant bridewealth payments. This paper deals with three new questions which Kuper’s discussion raised: To what extent can the differentiation of male and female labour enrich the understanding of traditional arranged marriages (part 1); to what extent, despite the decline of marriage in the strictest sense of the term, have kinship ties beyond the narrow domestic domain continued to be influenced by gender (part 2); and to what extent have other social changes additional to labour migration (a booming cattle economy, an enormous expansion in the discovery of diamonds and other minerals, and a growth of the manufacturing industry) affected the division of male and female labour and marriage stability (part 3). Bibliogr., notes, ref.