Bibliography

Why Preventing Hostile Use of the Life Sciences is Relevant to Africa: The IRCR (International Committee of the Red Cross) Appeal on Biotechnology, Weapons and Humanity

This article sets out the concerns of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) about the risks of new advances in the life sciences being turned to hostile use and explains what it is doing to try to encourage objective risk assessment and reduction in this context. There are several reasons why actors in the life sciences in Africa should acknowledge and act on their responsibilities to reduce the risks of poisoning and the deliberate spreading of disease, consistent with the aims of the ICRC appeal, namely: a deliberate outbreak of disease could have catastrophic consequences for the populations, economies and environments of African countries; most African countries have formally accepted legally binding obligations to prevent poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease; greater vigilance towards the prevention of poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease could fit in with a broader public health framework in Africa, conceptually and for obtaining additional resources; if the African region is perceived as being seriously engaged in preventing poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease, this may enhance its prospects of achieving developmental and economic objectives; the prevention of the hostile use of the life sciences is low cost, high gain. Notes, ref., sum. [ASC Leiden abstract]

Title: Why Preventing Hostile Use of the Life Sciences is Relevant to Africa: The IRCR (International Committee of the Red Cross) Appeal on Biotechnology, Weapons and Humanity
Authors: Borrie, John
Loye, Dominique
Year: 2005
Periodical: African Security Review
Volume: 14
Issue: 1
Pages: 93-106
Language: English
Geographic term: Africa
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10246029.2005.9627340
Abstract: This article sets out the concerns of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) about the risks of new advances in the life sciences being turned to hostile use and explains what it is doing to try to encourage objective risk assessment and reduction in this context. There are several reasons why actors in the life sciences in Africa should acknowledge and act on their responsibilities to reduce the risks of poisoning and the deliberate spreading of disease, consistent with the aims of the ICRC appeal, namely: a deliberate outbreak of disease could have catastrophic consequences for the populations, economies and environments of African countries; most African countries have formally accepted legally binding obligations to prevent poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease; greater vigilance towards the prevention of poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease could fit in with a broader public health framework in Africa, conceptually and for obtaining additional resources; if the African region is perceived as being seriously engaged in preventing poisoning and the deliberate spread of disease, this may enhance its prospects of achieving developmental and economic objectives; the prevention of the hostile use of the life sciences is low cost, high gain. Notes, ref., sum. [ASC Leiden abstract]