Bibliography

Women, Work and Ideology in Nigeria

Focusing particularly on issues of women and work, this article explores some aspects of the pressures affecting women in Katsina, northern Nigeria, with special reference to the implications for women of these pressures, and with reference to women’s strategies to maximize their opportunities in a situation of economic difficulty and limited resources. The economic crisis has affected Katsina women in different ways, with class being an important referent. The changing situation is examined in part with reference to the married and non-married (widowed or divorced) women of two Katsina wards, Yarinci and Marina, which were the focus of research by the author from 1971 to 1973, repeated visits between 1974 and 1984, and follow-up field research in 1988. The author also draws from the experience of ‘independent women’ (courtesans or ‘karuwai’), and then focuses on Katsina women generally, with discussion also of neighbouring State policy specifically with reference to women’s trade. She demonstrates the operationalization, with varying degrees of State and community intervention, of multiple conflicting ideologies which circumscribe women and tend to support in practice their domestication and domesticity. Bibliogr., notes, sum.

Title: Women, Work and Ideology in Nigeria
Author: Pittin, Rene
Year: 1991
Periodical: Review of African Political Economy
Volume: 18
Issue: 52
Period: November
Pages: 38-52
Language: English
Geographic terms: Nigeria
Northern Nigeria
External link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03056249108703920
Abstract: Focusing particularly on issues of women and work, this article explores some aspects of the pressures affecting women in Katsina, northern Nigeria, with special reference to the implications for women of these pressures, and with reference to women’s strategies to maximize their opportunities in a situation of economic difficulty and limited resources. The economic crisis has affected Katsina women in different ways, with class being an important referent. The changing situation is examined in part with reference to the married and non-married (widowed or divorced) women of two Katsina wards, Yarinci and Marina, which were the focus of research by the author from 1971 to 1973, repeated visits between 1974 and 1984, and follow-up field research in 1988. The author also draws from the experience of ‘independent women’ (courtesans or ‘karuwai’), and then focuses on Katsina women generally, with discussion also of neighbouring State policy specifically with reference to women’s trade. She demonstrates the operationalization, with varying degrees of State and community intervention, of multiple conflicting ideologies which circumscribe women and tend to support in practice their domestication and domesticity. Bibliogr., notes, sum.